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dc.coverage.spatialASIA AND THE PACIFIC
dc.creatorUN.ESCAP
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-26T05:41:51Z
dc.date.available2022-05-26T05:41:51Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.isbn9789211208283
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12870/4448
dc.description.abstractAsia-Pacific Disaster Report 2022 for ESCAP subregions: Summary for Policymakers builds on ESCAP’s Asia Pacific Disaster Report 2021, Asia and the Pacific SDG Progress Report 2022 and the latest reports (2021/2022) issued by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). IPCC reports show a startling increase in global warming impacts in that, as we move from 1.5 to 2 degrees of warming, the risks to economies and people increase exponentially. It is worth noting that, while the overarching trends in climate change are global, they translate into different warming trends and impacts for each sub-region of Asia and the Pacific. Therefore, all sub-regions require their own risk profiles with sub-regional specificities in order to develop tailor-made resilience pathways to tackle multiple hazards. <br><br> <p>ESCAP has downscaled the global models of warming to Asia and the Pacific and its sub-regions. The Asia Pacific Disaster Report 2022 for ESCAP Subregions shows that under all climate-change scenarios, and in comparison to global averages, Asia and the Pacific will be most impacted by heavy precipitation, followed by agricultural drought, hot temperatures/heatwaves, and warming winds with intensifying tropical cyclones. Further, the Report highlights how each ESCAP subregion will be impacted in the medium to long term climate scenarios, and where the new hotspots of exposure and vulnerability to climate-induced, cascading multi-hazard scenarios will be created. This analysis highlights the sub-regional specificities which could otherwise be masked by the regional analysis.</p> <p><b>The Report recommends three key policy action tracks:</b></p> <p><b>First—Customized adaptation & resilience pathways</b> with emphasis on risk informed development policies and investments. The adaptation gaps are critical in vulnerable subregions which are likely to be impacted the most in the 1.5-to-2-degree warming scenarios. </p> <p><b>Second—Frontier technologies and digital innovations</b> not only reduce the cost of implementing the policy interventions, but also have game-changing impacts on scaling up transformative adaptation through enhanced risk analytics like impact forecasting and integrated multi-hazard risk assessment and early warning, surveillance, and strategic foresights, as well as for efficiently managing pandemics like COVID-19. </p> <p><b>Third—Regional co-operation along with subregional co-operation</b> hold immense potential for addressing the region’s shared vulnerabilities and risks that are set to be more critical at 1.5 to 2 degrees warming. Sub-regional co-operation approaches is key to supporting transboundary ecosystem adaptations and nature-based solutions for building the region’s resilience and moving towards a climate resilient society for all. </p> <p>To facilitate the implementation of these recommendations, ESCAP has put in place the <b>Asia-Pacific Risk and Resilience Portal</b> as a delivery mechanism of the Asia-Pacific Disaster Resilience Network. It is aimed at supporting monitoring and implementation of climate and disaster-related Sustainable Development Goals as well as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. </p>
dc.format.extentiii, 29 p.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUnited Nations
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAsia Pacific Disaster Report (APDR)
dc.rightsThis publication may be reproduced in whole or in part for educational or non-profit purposes without special permission from the copyright holder, provided that the source is acknowledged. The ESCAP Publications Office would appreciate receiving a copy of any publication that uses this publication as a source.
dc.rightsUse may not be made of this publication for resale or any other commercial purpose whatsoever without prior permission. Applications for such permission, with a statement of the purpose and extent of reproduction, should be addressed to the Secretary of the Publications Board, United Nations, New York.
dc.subjectDisaster risk reduction
dc.titleAsia-Pacific Riskscape @1.5C : subregional pathways for adaptation and resilience
dc.typeText
dc.rights.holderUnited Nations
dc.subject.unbistNATURAL DISASTERS
dc.subject.unbistDISASTER PREPAREDNESS
dc.subject.unbistDISASTER PREVENTION
dc.subject.unbistCLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION
dc.subject.unbistCLIMATE CHANGE
dc.subject.unbistNEW TECHNOLOGIES
dc.subject.unbistTECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS
dc.subject.unbistGLOBAL WARMING
dc.subject.unbistMEDICAL ASPECTS
escap.publisherPlaceBangkok
escap.doctypeReport
escap.programmeOfWorkICT and Disaster Risk Reduction
escap.areasOfWorkBuilding Resilience to Disasters
escap.unSDG13. Climate Action
escap.unDocSymbolST/ESCAP/3011
escap.bibLevelMonograph
escap.link.internalLinkhttps://www.unescap.org/kp/2022/asia-pacific-disaster-report-2022-escap-subregions-summary-policymakers-0
escap.subregionEast and North-East Asia
escap.subregionNorth and Central Asia
escap.subregionPacific
escap.subregionSouth and South-West Asia
escap.subregionSouth-East Asia
escap.contactPhone+66 2 288-1234
escap.contactEmail[email protected]
dc.identifier.eisbn9789210057776
escap.contactUnitICT and Disaster Risk Reduction Division
escap.ispartofseriesnoAsia Pacific Disaster Report (APDR) ; No. 2022
dc.date.escap2022-04-18
dc.relation.ispartofseriesnoNo. 2022


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